Boost Innovation | Culture Meets Technology

Show Up: How To Start Enjoying Work and Sport

One of the things that we have found over months of data collection is that we have a wealth of information on the people who enjoy doing what others don’t. It’s time to start enjoying work and sport every single time.

We have been in contact with HUNDREDS of people who have told us they enjoy their [work & sport] commitments every single day.

So if you’re reading this and immediately calling bullsh*t…we get it because that was our first thought too**.

**Not because of working at Boost. We literally LOVE IT HERE.


It Doesn’t Have To Be This Way

One of the most ridiculous “norms” of the 21st century is that enjoying going to work is normal.

Newsflash, it’s only normal if you allow it to be, and it’s normal to allow it to be.

Have you ever known someone who shows up to work every day and seems to love to be there?

What about that person who shows up to your team’s practice everyday ready to rock with a great attitude, loving life and working hard?

There’s a way to get on that level.

The reality is that culture is what makes people feel this way. But “culture” is not necessarily a group thing. We have both INTERNAL and EXTERNAL culture, and we can control only one of them, but we can measure both.

How We Can Measure Wanting To Show Up and Having To Show Up

To start enjoying work and sport more, our internal culture is something we can grab control of. How we see the world, understand those around us, and relate to circumstances that influence our emotions. This can be captured by things such as the Big Five Personality Traits or Boost Innovation’s Culture Growth metrics.

The external culture is much further from our control and can be captured through tools related to things like Hofstede’s Organizational Culture Dimensions.

The Difference Between Wanting To Show Up & Having To Show Up

We can actually control a lot of different aspects all of the above, but only if we measure very specific aspects of culture first.

The aspects that we NEED TO MEASURE are:

  • Knowledge of the things you need to know for group success
  • Mindset of what you’re capable of as an individual

When we measure these things, we are able to begin to build the foundation of the fundamentals of cultural desire shown here:

  • “I know what I do and don’t know about the tasks I need to do well here”
  • “My strengths and weaknesses when it comes to my mindset”
  • “I know what mindset components I need to improve to accomplish my tasks at a high level”

The Most Important Piece

Have a shared vision and values based on authentic connection with each other.

If the vision and values are only the leader’s, only those they lead’s, or build on in-authenticity, the culture is work.

Build it together through true human connection, and daily enjoyment follows.

Go to GRW Project for your workplace, or the FLW Project for your sport and decide to enjoy showing up for work and sport forever.

JOIN THE BOOST COMMUNITY

We never send more than one email a week. We stay informative… and sometimes even funny!

SUBSCRIBE FOR MORE

RECENT POSTS

Share Article

Share on email
Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin

More Articles

Boost Innovation

Belonging At Work & Growth

When it comes to belonging at work we must leverage our people’s new understanding of themselves. This enhances both financial and wellness factors in a reliable way. An Introduction To Belonging At Work What many people have learned recently is what it feels to “belong” when at work. The question

Read More »
ego depletion and group culture
Boost Innovation

Ego Depletion and Group Culture

There is a lot of research in this area by Roy Baumeister. He’s the expert and I am going to loosely parse his words to apply to the craft of building culture. Please reach out to Roy for an expert opinion because his stuff is awesome. Poke The Ego, Hurt

Read More »
Group Culture Improvement
Boost Innovation

Group Culture Improvement You Can Afford To Miss

Data-Based Solutions From 2020 It’s been a long time since people who work in groups, compete on teams, and lead others have been challenged in the way that they are right now. We spent a week collecting data points based of human actions, statements, formal interviews and informal conversation in

Read More »

Get content like this sent directly to your inbox!